An analysis of the character of elisa in the chrysanthemums by john steinbeck

Elisa seems pleased and proud. She says she wishes women could live the kind of life he does.

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She allows her emotions to control her and lets go of her masculine side, freeing her central feminine sexuality, according to Sweet Because she has gone back to her feminine role, according to Renner, "she remains a pitiable victim of male domination and female disadvantage" She is attracted to the tinker because, as Stanley Renner points out, he represents a world of adventure and freedom that only men enjoy The strangers get into their Ford coupe and leave.

Relationships and family life is another primary theme of The Chrysanthemums that John Updike projects in his work. The Chrysanthemums Theme The Chrysanthemums succeeds to project the feelings of women to strong men.

The Chrysanthemums

Thus, Elisa may be attempting to plant chrysanthemum flowers to symbolize some dead hopes of bearing their own children. Elisa in unclear of what her problem is in her life just like the fog.

Her hardworking nature and charisma to work in the garden reflect the nature of chores associated with females.

The Chrysanthemums Summary and Analysis

They discuss the flowers, and the tinker says that he has a customer who wants to raise chrysanthemums. Elisa looks down at the stems of her flowers, which she has kept entirely free of pests. She explains that the most care is needed when the budding begins. After this conversation with her husband, she goes back to her masculine role of transplanting the flowers.

The Chrysanthemums Analysis

The description of the valley as a pot closed shows that Elisa is trapped in a world where she feels tired and exhausted to be in.

Her despair is also evident his husband asks her out. She has allowed herself to become emotional, "the trait women possess," whereas men conduct business unemotionally Sweet She is attracted to the tinker because, as Stanley Renner points out, he represents a world of adventure and freedom that only men enjoy Throughout the story, Elisa suffers a regression from the masculine role she sees as equality to the feminine role she sees as submissive.

When her husband, Henry, comments about her "strong" chrysanthemum crop, Elisa is pleased by the manliness the word implies, but her husband reminds her of her femininity by offering her an evening on the town.

Elisa says she has read that at the fights the men beat each other until their boxing gloves are soaked with blood. Since when does Elisa "guess" when it comes to chrysanthemums? Her house, which stands nearby, is very clean.

Henry says she is different again, but then says kindly that he should take her out more often. She scrubs herself "until her skin was scratched and red" Steinbeck First, the couple have been presented in a way that they do not have children.

He becomes vulnerable but instead of picking a quarrel to assert his place, he suggests that Elisa grows some cash crop in place of chrysanthemums. She responds eagerly to this suggestion, but it seems he was only joking.

The businessmen had come to discuss a deal with Henry. Because she has gone back to her feminine role, according to Renner, "she remains a pitiable victim of male domination and female disadvantage" Henry immediately notices the transformation and compliments her with the feminine "nice" instead of "strong," which is masculine.

For most women, liberation was a bitter fight usually ending in defeat.

John Steinbeck's

We see how she keeps the flowerbeds clean and the house very tidy and orderly. In fact, if you contrast her relationship with the tinker to her relationship with her husband, one thing becomes totally clear: Her husband Henry seems to play a limited role in filling the emptiness in her life, a situation that leaves her with no choice other than preoccupying herself in the garden and attempts to find her own way out.

He compares her flowers to a "quick puff of colored smoke" Steinbeck After explaining the shortest way to him, the man says that he also sharpens farm tools on his way to his destination.Character Analysis of Elisa Allen in The Chrysanthemums by Steinbeck.

Many readers who analyze Steinbeck's short story, "The Chrysanthemums", feel Elisa's flowers represent her repressed sexuality, and her anger and resentment towards men. Just as the Chrysanthemums fight to stay strong and meaningful in the short story, “The Chrysanthemums” by John Steinbeck, the main character, Emily, tries to do the same.

Both the setting and overall mood of the characters, support the comparison of Emily to her Chrysanthemums.

Character Analysis of Elisa Allen in "The Chrysanthemums" by John Steinbeck "The Chrysanthemums," written by John Steinbeck, captures one day in the life of a woman who yearns for a more fulfilling life. The Chrysanthemums study guide contains a biography of John Steinbeck, literature essays, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

About The Chrysanthemums The Chrysanthemums Summary. The Chrysanthemums by John Steinbeck is a short story that reflects the difficulties of a woman in the society especially where her role have been taken to mean conformity to man’s command.

The story is dominated by the symbolism of Chrysanthemums flowers that Elisa finds her solace in from the emptiness of her world. Character Analysis. Elisa is our girl. She's a rancher's wife, an awesome gardener, and a pretty strong lady. But still, she doesn't quite seem happy with her day-to-day life, so when the tinker approaches and the pair strike up their mysterious and revealing conversation, her life changes, maybe forever.

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An analysis of the character of elisa in the chrysanthemums by john steinbeck
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